Thursday Links: What I’ve been looking at and reading

Looking At

I have some New Yorker covers, all by Chris Ware, on the wall in my classroom. During some “get to know you” conversation time this week, I watched this video with one of my classes:

One of my students told me I should look at all of the photos on the internet of the dog breed, puli, jumping:

pulijump

And I told them about Beck (they had not heard about him!), and his album Odelay (although that’s a Hungarian Komondor, not a puli):

odelay

Reading

In another class, one of my students asked me what I’ve been reading. I didn’t have a very satisfactory answer because the truth is I’m rereading Life of Pi because I’m currently teaching it. Even though I won’t give these to my students to read, here are the most interesting reviews of the book I’ve read lately:

Kaveney, Roz. “Guess Who’s for Dinner.” Times Literary Supplement 5180 (19 July 2002): 25. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism. Ed. Tom Burns and Jeffrey W. Hunter. Vol. 192. Detroit: Gale, 2005. Literature Resource Center. Web. 14 Sept. 2016.

Mishra, Pankaj. “The Man, or the Tiger?” New York Review of Books 50.5 (27 Mar. 2003): 17-18. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism. Ed. Tom Burns and Jeffrey W. Hunter. Vol. 192. Detroit: Gale, 2005. Literature Resource Center. Web. 14 Sept. 2016.

Stratton, Florence. “‘Hollow at the core’: Deconstructing Yann Martel’s Life of Pi.” Studies in Canadian Literature / Études en littérature canadienne [Online], 29.2 (2004): n. pag. Web. 14 Sep. 2016.

Wood, James. “Credulity.” Rev. of Life of Pi, by Yann Martel. London Review of Books 24.22 (2002): 24-25. Web. 14 Sep. 2016.

In short, I’m reading it for the fourth time, and it doesn’t hold up. I like teaching it because a lot of the students enjoy reading it, and I’m for anything that gets students excited about literature and storytelling.

Last year, I went to a workshop on Robinson Crusoe (Daniel Defoe) and Foe (J.M. Coetzee), and I would like to get to know Coetzee better, and I’d like to think of a context in which students would be interested in the religious, political, and historical context of Robinson Crusoe.

This summer, I read: Citizen: An American Lyric (Rankine), The Parable of the Sower (Butler), Unfamiliar Fishes (Vowell), Desperate Characters (Fox), Disgrace (Coetzee), But What If We’re Wrong? (Klosterman), Animal Farm (Orwell),  Theogony (Hesiod). A couple of those I didn’t finish. I intended to reread (but almost like a reading because it’s been a while) The Republic (Plato) and The High Cost of Free Parking (Shoup), but it didn’t happen. I read two Joy Williams short stories and “Maybe It Was the Distance” (Safran Foer) in the New Yorker.

And these are three articles that I’ve read in the last week (or so):

Unless You’re Oprah, ‘Be Yourself’ Is Terrible Advice

My Parents’ Mixed Messages on the Holocaust

The Biggest Political Lie of 2016

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s